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C. S. Lewis, the Great War, and an Unwitting Canadian Connection

It’s July 8, 1917. The Great War rages on the Continent and an 18-year-old C. S. Lewis settles into his new life at the University of Oxford. Studies are on hold, the school nearly empty. Most his peers are on the battlefield, many already dead. He himself will reach the

Difficult Questions

I first read Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morality as an undergrad. I return to that book every few years, as it remains for me the biggest challenge to my Christian faith. In this work, Nietzsche tells a story of how morality as we know it today came into being,

Reframing Human

This is a short excerpt from a book that I am currently writing on the theological and political significance of witnessing to atrocity. The book is a theological dialogue with Italian philosopher, Giorgio Agamben, on the nature of remembering as a political and theological task. In his unforgettable Remnants of

Not “Like Trees, Walking”

In the Gospel of Mark the disciples are often depicted as perplexed by the meaning of Jesus’ parables and deeds. There are several miracles of transformation – represented by deafness to hearing or from blindness to sight. And there are two miracles of abundance – feeding 5,000 and then 4,000

Wisdom from the East

After the season of the Incarnation, the Church calendar turns to Epiphany, heralded on January 6 by the story of the Magi, wise ones from the East. It is a story of how Jesus comes to be perceived as One in whom the very nature of God is uniquely revealed,

Shared Pain: The Power of Jeremiah’s Laments

“You deceived me, LORD, and I was deceived; you overpowered me and prevailed. I am ridiculed all day long; everyone mocks me. Whenever I speak, I cry out proclaiming violence and destruction. So the word of the LORD has brought me insult and reproach all day long.” ‒ Jeremiah 20:7-8

Division and Unification

Anglicans tend to be ambivalent about the Reformation. Are we a reformed church or not? I can already see the letters to the editor answering this question vehemently from both sides – and that very disagreement tells us something about the Anglican Church. Certainly the Church in England was caught

A Return to Allegorical Readings of Scripture

There are texts in scripture that present moral problems and, throughout history, the Church has found it difficult to come to terms with many of the teachings and stories in scripture. Today, the Church employs various approaches to these difficult texts: the more conservative voices usually place the importance of

Bob Dylan and the Theological Imagination

New York City was cold, muffled and mysterious, the capital of the world. On 7th Avenue I passed the building where Walt Whitman had lived and worked. I paused momentarily imagining him printing away and singing the true song of his soul. I had stood outside of Poe’s house on

CURRENT ISSUE

The Living Past

February is Black History Month! This issue of RLN starts off with a message from the Rev. Wilson Akinwale who was recently elected National Board Chair of the Black Anglicans of Canada and an announcement of an afternoon celebration of Black excellence. 

 
 

Next, Chris Trott discusses the history of Inuit catechists, many of whom are little known in Anglican history or whose names and lives have not been documented at all. Trott shows that these catechists have and continue to be integral to Indigenous Anglicans. 

 

Diocesan Archivist, Mary Horodyski, writes about the troubling history of the Dynavor ‘Indian’ hospital which the Diocese of Rupert’s Land ran from 1896 to 1939. This article responds to the 59th Call to Action issued by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission by shedding light on a difficult and little known part of Anglican history. A warning to readers that the history discussed in this article is troubling. 

 

Based on an interview with members of the Committee on the Land Statement, the article “Land Acknowledgement as Confession” explores the work and thinking this committee has undertaken to reassess their parish’s land acknowledgement, exploring deeper ways to commit themselves to reconciliation as a collective effort and a call to action

 

This issue also includes a Parish Profile on St. Aidan’s Anglican exploring the deep sense of connection members of this parish have found in their love for God the creator and their commitment to creating little corners of God’s glory

 

I hope you find learning and enjoyment in reading this month’s articles.

 

Read and download February’s issue here.

 

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