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April Magazine 2017

April’s issue is on Contemplation and includes articles on the importance of contemplative practice, as well as a beginner’s guide to a few Christian practices. There’s also an article in memory of the late Rev. Brad Elliott from Christ Church in Selkirk. Click here to view the pdf. Or, read

Bob Dylan and the Theological Imagination

New York City was cold, muffled and mysterious, the capital of the world. On 7th Avenue I passed the building where Walt Whitman had lived and worked. I paused momentarily imagining him printing away and singing the true song of his soul. I had stood outside of Poe’s house on

Keeping Faith in Silence

You might have missed the sparsely advertised film Silence, which was in two Winnipeg theatres for about two weeks in January. If you did, that’s a shame, because this is a profound and thought-provoking movie. Directed by Martin Scorsese, this 161-minute film is based off the 1966 Shūsaku Endō novel

Becoming People of the Land

The following is the last article in our series on Identity and Land. See Deanna Zantingh’s piece, “Uncovering the Truth: Land is Central” in January’s issue and Ellen Cook’s piece, “The Land Restores Identity” in February’s. Both Deanna Zantingh and Ellen Cook’s recent articles in the Rupert’s Land News were

The Human Spark and Encounters with Dementia

I first encountered dementia when my elementary school class went to sing Christmas carols in a personal care home. One woman in particular caught my eye and I begged my mom to let me bring her a Christmas present. It turned out that she was my classmate’s grandmother, living with

Adapting to Failure

Failure hangs over me constantly. In the past seven years, it’s been a daily, if not hourly hurdle. Sometimes its the small things, like forgetting a word. Sometimes it’s the medium things, like walking into a tree. Sometimes, it is a series of slights or omissions that end up hurting

March Magazine 2017

March’s issue of Rupert’s Land News explores different facets of disability, and includes a review of Silence and a look at Bob Dylan’s theological imagination. Download the pdf here or read it below in Issuu.

Art for our Eyes and Hearts

I have been a visual artist for over 30 years. I am inspired by the beauty of God’s creation and aim to capture and reflect that through the use of vibrant colours, energy, and gentle-yet-bold interpretation that encompasses a spirit-filled essence of love, faith, and hope. In 2007, my work

New Beginnings in Stained Glass

When River East Mennonite Brethren Church decided to fill their 20 columns of ceiling-to-floor-windows with stained glass, the congregation immediately resolved to make it a community project. “Community is an important concept in the way we understand what God is doing in the world. God is in the business of

The Land Restores Identity

This article is a follow up to Deanna Zantingh’s piece in January’s issue, “Uncovering the Truth: Land is Central.” I have a beautiful house by the Assiniboine River near Winnipeg, but when I say I am going “home,” I mean the place where I was born: Misipawistik Cree Nation in

February Magazine 2017

February’s issue of Rupert’s Land News explores Art as a form of worship and features the work of two artists from the Diocese. Download the pdf here or read it in Issuu below.

To live and pray in Pembina Hills

Yes, it has been six years since our group of five churches – Clearwater, Pilot Mound, Manitou, Kaleida, and Altamont – which initially made up the parishes of Pembina Hills,have been commissioned as Local Collaborative Ministry (LCM), a form of ministry that involves members of congregations volunteering their time and

Why Winnipeg? Being Muslim in Rupert’s Land

I am often asked why I chose Winnipeg to be my home. My answer is simple. In my 40 years in Winnipeg, I have not once doubted my initial impression of this city as one that has a soul. Winnipeg is my home. I have lived nowhere else this long.

Uncovering the truth: land is central

I turned on the radio in time to hear CBC perfectly capture my past year’s journey in one sentence. “The thing about seeking reconciliation with indigenous peoples is that eventually you realize you also have to make reconciliation with the land,” said Caleb Behn, a Salish activist and lawyer. I

Traditions across Canada, for better or worse

Here’s a little quiz appropriate for the season. 1. What country invented the department store Santa? 2. What country invented the Santa Claus parade? 3. In what country do young people go door-to-door at Christmas begging, threatening to torture the oldest daughter of the house if a donation is not

January Magazine 2017

January’s issue of Rupert’s Land News explores Canadian traditions around Christmas, reconciliation and land, and an update from our friends in the parishes of Pembina Hills. Download the pdf here or read it in Issuu below.

Christmas tables of many kinds

Do you eat dinner at the table? With demographics showing nearly 30% of homes to be single occupant residences, and less than half of families reporting eating together up to five times a week, statistically you may not! With Thanksgiving and harvest behind us, and the bounty and abundance of

The Messiah in the time of Trump

In the warm, spindled foyer where I go to university, there hangs a collection of paintings. On the stairway they are flanked by portraits of nineteenth century university doyens, in anachronistic yet recognizable clothing – principles, deans, emeriti. They are joined in the middle by six bearded and awkwardly collared

CURRENT ISSUE

The Living Past

February is Black History Month! This issue of RLN starts off with a message from the Rev. Wilson Akinwale who was recently elected National Board Chair of the Black Anglicans of Canada and an announcement of an afternoon celebration of Black excellence. 

 
 

Next, Chris Trott discusses the history of Inuit catechists, many of whom are little known in Anglican history or whose names and lives have not been documented at all. Trott shows that these catechists have and continue to be integral to Indigenous Anglicans. 

 

Diocesan Archivist, Mary Horodyski, writes about the troubling history of the Dynavor ‘Indian’ hospital which the Diocese of Rupert’s Land ran from 1896 to 1939. This article responds to the 59th Call to Action issued by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission by shedding light on a difficult and little known part of Anglican history. A warning to readers that the history discussed in this article is troubling. 

 

Based on an interview with members of the Committee on the Land Statement, the article “Land Acknowledgement as Confession” explores the work and thinking this committee has undertaken to reassess their parish’s land acknowledgement, exploring deeper ways to commit themselves to reconciliation as a collective effort and a call to action

 

This issue also includes a Parish Profile on St. Aidan’s Anglican exploring the deep sense of connection members of this parish have found in their love for God the creator and their commitment to creating little corners of God’s glory

 

I hope you find learning and enjoyment in reading this month’s articles.

 

Read and download February’s issue here.

 

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